Shooting Talladega Superspeedway

We profile two photographers tasked with capturing all the action at NASCAR's largest and fastest raceway and ask them to divulge some tricks of the trade.

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Bobby Labonte’s crew changes four tires and fills the tank. A good pit stop can be done in 14 seconds and often, the pit crew undergoes extreme physical training and has the athletic ability of Olympic-class athletes.

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Photographers capture images at Talladega Superspeedway. Located in Lincoln, Alabama, it is a 2.66 mile trioval track and is the largest that NASCAR races on during the 10 month season.

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NASCAR driver Elliott Sadler flips end-over-end in the trioval area at Talladega Superspeedway. Sadler walked away from the wreck.

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Paul Menard’s crew look with disappointment at a broken radiator during a pit stop needed after a green flag collision at Talladega Superspeedway.

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Bob Crisp’s image of Dale Earnhardt Jr., shows the effectiveness of panning to illustrate speed.

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NASCAR veteran drivers Sterling Marlin (40) and Bobby Labonte (18) collide in the trioval section of Talladega Superspeedway in Lincoln, Alabama.

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Mug shot of Bob Crisp.

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A car shoots flames at the Martinsville, Virginal Speedway.

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Speed can be illustrated by having all objects within the image still except for the cars traveling the track.

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Shots made from outside the outer retaining walls can be particularly dangerous for the track photographer.

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Dale Earnhardt Jr., pits at the Talladega Superspeedway. Shooting the pits from the grand stand photo towers can offer a different view for readers.

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Spotters stand in the turn 3 tower at Talladega Superspeedway. Spotters play an integral part in keeping the track safe by being the eyes at the four corners of the track.

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Using unusual technique can often take a photo from average to exceptional. Here, a fish-eye lens is used to shoot the track and the Goodyear blimp.

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A portrait of Matt Kenseth at a NASCAR track.

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A portrait of Juan Montoya at a NASCAR track.

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A speed shot at Darlington Raceway.

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Shooting from the photo towers can give you a vantage point above the fences.

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A portrait of a Budweiser pit crew member.

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Mug shot of David Griffin.

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Shooting pit action with a wide-angle lens can give you a more realistic feeling. Here, Bobby Labonte’s crew fills their driver’s tank with gas. A typical NASCAR pit stop is performed in less than 14 seconds.

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The group mentality continues in Victory Lane and there are often more photographers than space to shoot.

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Jeff Gordon reacts to his win at the Talladega Superspeedway Victory Lane. Reaction can be telling in a still photo and is often the most coveted aspect of a photo for the working photojournalist.